MontanaRon

Just another ordinary English teacher eclectic expat blog about nothing in particular.

Month: May 2014

Hot and Busy

Yes, it’s quite hot in Vientiane today. According to Weather Underground, it’s 38 centigrade (100 F.) right now at 4 p.m. on Monday afternoon, but the other part of the current temperature, the part titled “Feels Like,” states that it feels like 46, which is 115 F. Hot. Very Hot. I’m glad that I’m at the nicely air conditioned school, working on my lesson plans and preparing to teach.

I was teaching just three days a week-Tuesday and Thursday evenings and Saturday morning-but one of the other teachers went back to England for a 3-week vacation, and I was asked if I’d like to cover his classes until he returns. Never one to turn down some extra money, I agreed. So, I’m now also teaching on Monday, Wednesday and Friday evenings. That’ll keep me pretty busy, so I’m not sure when I’ll get some more extensive posts (with photos) up. I want to do some posts that cover driving a motorbike in Vientiane (never a dull moment), harvesting green onions (very dull for me, but an interesting process), and a temple visit Nai and I made during the New Year celebrations last month. I’ll probably get the temple visit posted sooner than anything else, so stay tuned for more later.

In an Ideal Communist Country . . .

I read the English version of the Vientiane Times about once or twice a week. On one of the inside pages is a section devoted to what is being written in other Laos newspapers, translated into English. One of the papers is the Pathet Lao Daily, which I assume is an organ of the Communist Party here.

About 10 days ago, the Times quoted the Pathet Lao Daily ranting about the music that was played at gatherings during the recent New Year celebrations. I’m paraphrasing because I don’t have the article, but the Daily wrote, more or less, that a large percentage of the music being played at parties was Thai, when the rule is that people must play at least 70% Lao music.

I think I might have laughed out loud when I read this. The article went on to explain that people weren’t being patriotic enough in their choice of music. I don’t think patriotism should be the issue. Perhaps Lao music sucks compared to Thai music. (It does.) The ruling class might be quivering in their boots that choice of music might spell doom for the regime. Kind of hearkens back to when Elvis Presley was reviled for his hip-shakin’ style. Do you oldsters remember? I do. More later.

© 2020 MontanaRon

Theme by Anders NorenUp ↑