MontanaRon

Just another ordinary English teacher eclectic expat blog about nothing in particular.

Month: May 2016

Rainy Season Arrives

Finally, any remnants of a drought have been shattered, at least near Vientiane. Just a few weeks ago, there were rocket festivals going on in various parts of the country, where rockets were fired off to summon rain from whatever spirits might be responsible for the weather. These homemade devices aren’t weak, either, with some of them able to take down low-flying aircraft. Local officials have to inform government authorities when the festivals are taking place so that they can warn the airlines and other aircraft to steer clear of the areas.

This image taken from intellasia.net

This image taken from intellasia.net

After several days of often heavy and lengthy rainfalls, some folks (our neighbors, for example) are setting off bottle rockets and a few more powerful “bombs” to get the rain to let up. You just gotta be careful what you ask for.

We had some of these heavy rains over the weekend, and they finally quit just as I was preparing to ride in to work this morning. I was a bit leery about riding on the back road, mostly dirt, thinking it would be a mud pit out to the main highway. It wasn’t as bad as I expected, but I did have to wend my way slowly and carefully in some places. I was too busy threading my way through the mud to notice how much the Mekong might have risen, but I’ll take a gander tomorrow.

Chili and (Ant) Eggs

Not your typical breakfast, but I guess it’s the season for ant larva out here. Nai’s brother, Guay, came over and “shook down” some of the smaller trees and bushes for the “eggs,” of which he got thousands. He sells them for 50,000 kips a batch. That’s about $6, which is pretty expensive, in my opinion. They get eaten as a snack, boiled first. Throw in some hot chilis and you’ve got yourself a… well, the Lao people like them, but no thanks.

Ant larvae for eating

Here they are, thousands of the little critters, long dead. They’ve been boiled, but you can see some of their progenitors in the mix. They get eaten too. I’m adventurous in many things, but I’m not much of a food explorer. I’ll pass on these.

Ant larvae with chili peppers

Well, you sure can’t eat ’em just plain. Let’s throw in a few chopped up chili peppers for the heat and the color. Dig in.

Eating ant larvae

Nai digs in. Looks like he’s thrown in a few chopped green onions, too. Happy eating, Nai, but I’m certainly not going to drink from the same glass. The same rule as when you’re eating crickets!

Pi Mai Lao Holiday

Just a few photos from the recent Laos New Year (Pi Mai Lao), a holiday called Songkran in Thailand, where there are huge waterfights to mark the three-day event. Here in the village, the water throwing was much more subdued than elsewhere. Most people ask first if they can pour cold water down your back in a ritual cleansing, so to speak. It can get a bit out of hand, with water being slung about to include any bystanders, but it’s nothing like in Bangkok or even Vientiane, where there were some large-scale water fights on the main streets.

It’s also a religious celebration, where Buddhists go to their local temple and cleanse the Buddha statues, and it’s a time for house cleaning. Most people will do a thorough cleaning of their homes, sweeping, mopping, dusting and even a bit of painting to spruce the place up.

There were a few parties at Nai’s family compound, just a five-minute walk from where we live. Lots of food, beer and loud music (too loud). And fun.

P.S. I’m just now getting this posted due to a couple of factors. First, I couldn’t get any posting done at the farm because of the extremely crappy internet connection. Finally, the new school term started, so I can make use of the school internet, which is mostly…hmmm, just OK, I suppose, but it works. However, I’m teaching on a full-time basis this term, six days a week, so I’ve been quite busy at the start. I’m finally up to par on everything, so I’m able to get this up today. Enjoy. More later.

Seo, Nai's niece

Nai’s niece, Seo (pronounced, approximately, Saw) tends to some grilled duck. She and her husband, Khoon, live not too far from Vientiane.

Grilled duck

The duck’s grilling and it’s just the start of all the food that’ll be eaten today.

Squid, ready to grill.

Squid, cut up and almost ready to grill over an open fire. I don’t much care for it, so I’ll wait for the grilled fish.

Squid in chili sauce

Now it’s ready to grill, after marinating in a spicy chili sauce for a few minutes. Too hot for my taste buds.

Grilling the squid.

Nai takes charge of grilling the squid. He’ll end up eating the most, since he loves it.

Cut up squid.

It’s finally been grilled and cut into pieces. Ready to eat!

Awl eats squid.

Nai’s sister, Awl, enjoys some of the squid. She’d better get her share before Nai starts digging in.

Shredding papaya for salad.

One of Nai’s numerous cousins shreds raw papaya in preparation for making another staple, papaya salad.

Preparing the papaya salad.

Nai prepares the extremely spicy hot fixings that the papaya goes into. The mixture includes very hot chili peppers (the more, the better), tomatoes, lime juice and a fermented fish paste, which looks just awful. This concoction, when mixed with the papaya , is extremely hot, much too fiery for me. I nibble a little, but I soon rush to find some cold water. Whew!

Mixing the papaya salad.

Here, Nai uses a mortar and pestle to mix all the ingredients together. Next stop, mouth.

Eating papaya salad.

And, finally, everyone (except me) enjoys the papaya salad. I don’t know how they can eat something this hot and be so nonchalant about it. I guess it comes from a lifetime of eating it. Bon apetite.

Grilled fish

Now this is more like it. I love this fresh fish from the Mekong, grilled over a charcoal flame and stuffed with a few herbs. Simply delicious. These cost about 25,000 kips each, around $3.

Guay and blood soup

Nai’s brother, Guay, enjoys a couple of beers with some duck blood soup, kind of a staple (both beer and soup) on Pi Mai Lao.

Khoon and powdered face

Khoon, Seo’s husband, has been out running around the village, meeting friends, drinking beer, and getting his face coated with baby powder, another Pi Mai Lao tradition.

Kids in a wading pool.

It’s been very hot lately, so what better way for the kids to cool off than to hop in a small wading pool. The boy in front on the left is Leo, Nai’s two-year old nephew. Whenever he sees me taking photos, he makes this little square with his hands, which represents the camera, I suppose. He’s quite a ham. To his left is Guay’s daughter, Muoy. I’m not sure who the boy is in the back, just that it’s another one of the cousins.

Washing mother's feet

This is Pang showing obeisance to her mother, Awl, by washing her feet at the end of the day. When she finished the washing, she bowed down and placed her mother’s feet on the top of her head to show further respect. She did the same for her father’s feet.

Awl and Gaith

Gaith, Pang’s father, and Awl enjoying the end of the day. I think the look on Gaith’s face was caused by little Leo, his grandson, pouring some ice water down his pants.

Mother and father enjoy a happy moment.

Gaith and Awl enjoy a happy moment. I love Awl’s smile.

Family pose.

Gaith, Pang and Awl pose for a photo. The end of a long day for everyone. Bedtime.

Very Hot in Vientiane

Cripes, it’s been hot here lately, at least over the last month or so. The maximum temperature is breaking records almost every day, though official record keeping goes back to only 1999. Daily highs have been ranging from 100 to 106 degrees (38-42 C.), while the average high this time of year is around 91 or 92. Here’s a Weather Underground blog entry about the extraordinary heat wave in this area of the world.

We did get some heavy rain, winds and lightning this past Friday evening and the forecast is calling for a bit of rain over the weekend and into next week, so temperatures should drop a bit. However, due to the lack of advanced weather monitoring devices in the area, I take any forecast with a grain of salt. So often there has been a 100% chance of rain and . . . then, no rain at all. Or, the forecast calls for 0% or 5% and we get a deluge. Hopefully, we’ll get some more rain to relieve the heat and the ongoing drought that’s been deepening over the past few months.

Evil Spirit Loose in Village

Forgive the paucity of posts lately, but my internet connection out here at the farm has been horrendous the past few weeks. I can barely check out my email, let alone upload any photos to the blog or, indeed, even get access to the blog. Right now, the connection isn’t totally crappy, so I’ll do this short post. The new school term begins next week, so I’ll have better access at the school than I get out here.

Ghosts in the Village

Well, something has the villagers upset. The monks at one of the temples said that people should be very cautious about “spirits.” It seems that 15 villagers have died in their sleep over the past week. Nai tells me that we must be careful of “Dracula.” Because his English is limited, that’s his word for anything that might be monstrous or ghostly. I’m skeptical. Where did the monks get this information? I’ve seen nothing in the Vientiane newspaper that mentions the deaths, which surely would have caused a stir with that many people dying mysteriously in their sleep in such a small area. ┬áIf true, it should have raised an alarm outside the village. The monks urged people to visit their particular temple to seek guidance, protection and advice to stay safe. I assume people donated money to the temple. Sounds to me like a racket. At any rate, the neighbors and Nai encircled the house with twine that had been blessed by the monks. Whew! We’re safe until the next money-raising scheme.

Postscript: I rode my motorbike to a neighboring village to buy a few things at one of the chain store mini-marts and I noticed that the protective twine was strung along both sides of the road, running uninterrupted from house to house up to the end of the village, the “spirit line network” emanating from the temple in question. Our house is connected to the main line, as are other homes that are located beyond the road. It must have taken a lot of time and twine to connect everyone. I might not take this seriously, but the villagers do.

Coming up (when I have a better connection): Laos New Year (with photos), a visit to Nong Khai (with photos), the extremely hot weather we’ve been experiencing, and another Laos delicacy–ant larva (with photos). Stay tuned.

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