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Baseball in Laos? Yes!

Although in it’s early stages, baseball has been gradually growing in popularity in Laos. This past weekend there was an international tournament played in Vientiane, with 10 teams from 5 countries competing for a trophy and other prizes. The teams were from Laos, Vietnam, Thailand, Japan and Korea, which had the most teams here.

An article in the Vientiane Times yesterday gave a nice overview of the sport in the country. It seems that this was actually the 5th annual Korea-Laos International Baseball Tournament, but it’s the first I’ve ever heard of it. The tournament was played at the football (soccer) field, an all-grass setting, so no infield dirt or pitcher’s mound. However, the article stated that through funding from Korea, two new “stadiums” will be built before the end of 2019. I imagine that there won’t be two stadiums built, but, rather, two fields at a new baseball complex with seating. You never know, though.

So, I went to the football stadium this past Saturday to check it out. Here are a few photos from the event. One note: the sight lines were terrible, so I was unable to make any good photos. The “dugouts” were opaque plastic boxes which you couldn’t see through, the officials’ and umpires’ tables were directly behind home plate, there was a large schedule board blocking the view from another angle, and a concessions table also blocked the view, along with various protective nettings. I hope the new fields will not include these kinds of encumbrances to viewing the games.

The Times didn’t have the results of the tournament in yesterday’s edition, but I’ll check in today’s paper. I’ll update this post if there is any further news about the event.

UPDATE: The Tuesday Times reported that the Laos team tied for first in the tournament with a team from Seoul, South Korea, with each getting 33 points. Hmmm, I have no idea what the points represent. Run differential, perhaps? Anyway, congratulations to both teams.

(A further note on the photos. For a better view of an image, right click on the photo and select View Image. To get back to the post, you’ll have to click the Back Button on your browser.)

Laos baseball
Players from one of the Korean teams do a few warm-ups before their game. There were very few interested spectators at this particular game. The stands were mainly populated by friends of the players or by players from other teams. The Laos team was scheduled to play later in the afternoon, but I left before that particular game. Perhaps there were more people watching then.
Laos baseball
Kids are getting more and more interested in the game. I hope, eventually, that the sport becomes much more popular.
Laos baseball
Girls are involved, too. Check out the very long hair on this young lady.
Laos baseball
Because there is no pitcher’s mound built into the field, a portable mound was used. I’d never seen one of these before. Also, because of the grass infield, there weren’t too many stolen base attempts. Players were sliding into the bags, but I think they were using plastic-cleated shoes, not the metal spiked ones, which would probably have stuck in the grass, allowing for potential injuries.
Laos baseball
It’s a hit! Or was it? I think this guy knocked a single. They were using metal bats, which I hate, but, due to the cost of breakable wooden bats, I suppose the metal ones are a necessity.
Laos baseball
A minor collision at home plate. It was a bad throw, so the runner was safe.
Laos baseball
The Laos team was getting a pep talk from their manager or coach before their game, which was an hour or so from starting. I took off before then, so I didn’t get to see any of the action.

Recent Hoi An Trip

My friend Nai and I had a short holiday in Hoi An, Vietnam last month, and we had a decent stay. The UNESCO old town was interesting, even though we didn’t see much of it, and, being beach bums, we thought An Bang Beach was quite nice.

The biggest factor preventing full enjoyment of the trip was that my debit and credit cards weren’t working all the time. In hindsight, I should have taken more cash with me. The ATM machines weren’t much help in telling me why my debit card wasn’t working. The language they used was very confusing; mostly, it was something like “This machine cannot complete that process.” Why? Is the machine out of cash, is my card blocked? No idea. After we arrived at the hotel on Sunday evening, I walked quite a way to find some ATMs, but the card worked in none of them. I called my bank the next day, and, yes, they had blocked the card, even though I had told them I would be using it in Vietnam.

So, unblocked, it worked fine the next day and I was able to get some cash. Unfortunately, two days later, it again didn’t work. Called the bank again–something about a 48 hour exclusion. Couldn’t get it to work until the final day of the trip. Too late. Fortunately, a restaurant on the beach, La Plage, accepted credit cards and mine worked fine there each day. (That’s where we hung out; it’s a nice place to relax, if you’re ever out that way.)

Then, we checked out of the hotel on Saturday morning, and there were a few extra expenses to take care of. I had little cash left, but the credit card’s working, right? Wrong. It didn’t work at the hotel, for some reason. I think their connection was screwed up. I had called the bank again earlier that morning about my debit card, and they told me the card should be working again, but it was too far to get to an ATM before our ride to Da Nang airport, so I used up my remaining cash to pay the hotel. Got to the Da Nang airport, and the debit card worked fine; got back to Vientiane and the credit card worked fine. Go figure. Next time I go, if I go to Vietnam again (which I might), I’ll take plenty of cash.

Anyway, the trip was OK, despite the cards and despite the huge amount of tourists in the Old Town, which is why we didn’t explore it more (along with the cash problem). Here are some pics, along with comments.

An Bang Beach
Monday, our first full day in Hoi An, was overcast and quite windy, with a smattering of rain. We decided to go to the beach anyway. There were very few people there, and the beach was littered with debris and trash, brought in by the ocean during recent storms. Few restaurants were open, but we found The Deckhouse, where we got a seat at a table protected from the wind and occasional rain.
An Bang Beach
A few people at The Deckhouse braved the wind and rain for a brisk experience.
An Bang Beach
As you can see, the beach on Monday was practically deserted. Things changed, however, when we went back later in the week on some very nice, sunny, warm days.
An Bang Beach
OK, this is more like it. Sunny and warm, and better people watching. We lay under a cabana and watched the waves crashing off shore, or snoozed, or read a book, or walked along the beach. (Drank a few beers, too.) That’s Da Nang on the horizon, about 12 miles away. You can follow the beach all the way up there, if you’re so inclined. Also, of note, all the trash and debris had been cleaned off the beach. Very nice.
An Bang Beach
Here’s the view looking south along the beach. I ran this one through a Topaz Labs filter to try to give it a more painterly look.
An Bang Beach
A couple of Korean ladies, modestly attired, enjoy the sea breeze and sun. There was a very large Korean contingent at La Plage this day.
swimming pool
I suppose we could have stayed at our hotel, the Jade Hotel, and gone swimming in the pool. It looked clean, but the water was too cold. By the way, the Jade is a great bargain if you ever stay in Hoi An. It’s a bit far from the city center and it’s a ways from the beach, but the taxi fares (metered) are very cheap–a few dollars to the beach each way and about the same into the town. It has a 5-star rating on Trip Advisor and it’s a well-earned rating (except for the credit card hassle on the last day)-very clean and an exceptionally friendly staff. Oh, and did I mention it’s only about $20 a night!
swimming pool
This is a view of the pool from inside the small restaurant. The room rate includes breakfast, which includes coffee, tea, juice, fruit, bread, croissants, cereal and anything off the menu. I usually had fruit, toast, fried eggs and pancakes, and coffee every morning.
Tin Tin Restaurant
We sometimes took our lunch and evening meals at the Tin Tin Restaurant, just around the corner from the hotel. Great food and very cheap as well.
Nai at lunch
Nai is having a fish hotpot, I think, for lunch this day.
Hotpot
And I’m having a shrimp hotpot. I gotta say, Vietnamese cuisine is remarkably delicious. We never had a bad meal, though I did get overcharged at one place, due to a misprinted menu. It wasn’t that much, but it kind of soured me on the place. The Tin Tin, however, is a great place to eat.
Hoi An Old Town
Finally, we went to Hoi An Old Town, a UNESCO cultural heritage site. Unfortunately, we didn’t see much of it due to tiredness from lounging at the beach (HA!), hordes of tourists (like us) and my dwindling supply of cash. Here’s a view of some of the buildings from the other side of the Thu Bon River that runs through town. It seems that most of the buildings are this burnt-orange color, painted this way on purpose, I presume.
restaurant
One of the small restaurants in Old Town. There are many places to dine or have a coffee around here. I noticed that most of them were quite full.
bridge
A small, quaint bridge takes people to the other side of town across the river.
boat
You can hire a boat to take you on a river cruise.
boat
You can get a smaller boat that carries two passengers if you don’t want to use one of the large ones.
Thu Bon river
Looking along the river. I might have liked to take a float, but, again, low cash supply.

So, that was my first journey to Vietnam, and overall, it was OK. If I were going to give it a grade (and I’m not LOL), I’d give it a B- due to various reasons, like wrong time of year (we got lucky with the sunny days), too many tourists, and money problems. I’d like to go back again and stay in Hanoi and see Ha Long Bay (very famous, Google it), but it would have to be at the right season, probably spring or summer, before the rains set in. See you next time.